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Early American Face Vessels from the George H. Meyer Collection

Early American Face Jugs

Admission

This exhibit is free with museum general admission or membership.

Adult (13-61): $8.95

Seniors (62 +): $7.95

Children (3-12): $6.95

Infants 2 and under: FREE

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Early American Face Vessels from the George H. Meyer Collection

Opens Nov. 1, 2020

The traditional American stoneware face vessel has become an iconic art form, with important roots in South Carolina. George H. Meyer’s collection of over 100 early American face vessels provides us with the rare opportunity to see the tradition unfold in regions east of the Mississippi River and Texas, from the 1820s to 1940, including 20 early face vessels from South Carolina.

This exhibition shows that potters were not artists working in isolation, but rather interrelated craftsmen and often families sharing ideas and techniques. While these vessels have been the subject of increased scholarship in recent years, they remain somewhat enigmatic. These objects likely served many different functions and many of their makers remain unknown. The vessels in this exhibition demonstrate the artistry, variety, and power of this uniquely American art form.

Image credits: Far left – Face Jug, c. 1850–1860, alkaline glazed stoneware with kaolin eyes. Attributed to a maker at the B.F. Landrum or John Landrum Pottery, Horse Creek, SC. Center – Face Cup, c. 1860, alkaline glazed stoneware with kaolin eyes and teeth. Possibly made at the Colonel Thomas Davies, Palmetto Fire Brick Works, Bath, SC. Far right – Face Jug, c.1845–1855, alkaline glazed stoneware with kaolin eyes and teeth. Attributed to a maker at the B.F. Landrum or John Landrum Pottery, Horse Creek, SC. From the Collection of George H. Meyer. Photos by Charles B. Nairn.